Our Mission: The San Diego Food System Alliance is dedicated to developing and maintaining an equitable, healthy and sustainable food system for the benefit of all people in San Diego County.

 

About Us

As a multi-sector collaborative, the San Diego Food System Alliance (the Alliance) is creating system level changes by connecting, coordinating and catalyzing actions that move us towards our shared vision of Good Food for San Diego County. Our network consists of more than 120 groups with 40 Voting Members representing a diverse cross section of the food system including: distribution, health, food security, philanthropy, production, education and government.  

We create a space for conversation and collaboration by facilitating 6 Working Groups around the following areas: Healthy Food AccessReducing Barriers to FarmingFood RecoveryUrban AgricultureSustainable and Local Seafood and Good Food Procurement. Through regular convenings we are able to highlight intersections among our members to increase efforts around good food and catalyze solutions for system level changes through advocacy, educational campaigns, community events and special initiatives. 


Why the Alliance Exists 

photo credit: san diego childhood obesity initiative let's go local! produce showcase

photo credit: san diego childhood obesity initiative let's go local! produce showcase

Alliance One-Pager

"Starting more than 30 years ago, some academic experts and food activists began to see that the food system was touching more and more parts of our lives. Environmental issues, public health, issues of social and economic justice, and other concerns were all tied up with this mammoth system, one with huge economic importance. The production of agricultural goods added $331 billion to the U.S. economy in 2009, and hundreds of billions more came from processing, distributing and marketing those products. 

The other side of the economic coin is the cost to treat the health issues that arise when people don’t eat well. In 2012, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announced that by 2030 obesity rates in the United States are expected to jump to 42 percent, from today’s 34 percent. With the rise in obesity comes a staggering price to treat obesity-related illnesses: an estimated $550 billion each year.

Food experts and activists realized that a vast food system generated many policies, and for the most part, the average citizen didn’t have much of a role in shaping them. One way to address this lack of participation was by creating food policy councils or alliances, to bring together all stakeholders in a community food system and give them a say in constructing a system that reflected their values."

Source: Mark Winne, Doing Food Policy Councils Right: A Guide to Development and Action

Our Vision

SOURCE: FOOD SECURITY NETWORK OF NEWFOUNDLAND & LABRADOR

SOURCE: FOOD SECURITY NETWORK OF NEWFOUNDLAND & LABRADOR

We believe in cultivating an in ideal food system which considers the 4Es: 
Environment, Economics, Equity and Education.

Environment:

  • conservation of natural resources and arable land for food production

  • management of food scraps

  • adoption of agricultural best practices to minimize pollution

  • protection of waters, tidelands, and wildlife resources

Economics

  • fair wage practices in the industry

  • direct links between consumers and local producers

  • nurturing environment for new food entrepreneurs and entrepreneurs

  • sustainable economic models for ag, fishing, and food production

Equity

  • rights of all people to grow and produce their own food

  • access to healthy and locally produced food for all residents

  • resolution to disparities for ensuring food sovereignty, food security and food justice

Education

  • celebration of our diverse food heritage

  • knowledge around the origins of food: where and how it is produced, harvested and processed

  • environmental stewardship as foundation for learning about the food system

  • agricultural and fish production best practices that are economically profitable, environmentally sound and socially equitable