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San Diego Local Fisheries Event: Celebrating Passage of AB226, Pacific to Plate

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Public tickets are $20 and includes food + drinks!
Register: 
https://www.eventbrite.com/e/san-diego-local-fisheries-event-celebrating-passage-of-ab226-pacific-to-plate-tickets-19335159984

Photo credit: Jason Houston

San Diego Food System Alliance presents.... 

San Diego Local Fisheries Event: 
Celebrating Passage of AB226, Pacific to Plate

Date/Time: Monday, December 7th 3:00-6:00pm
Location: Manchester Grand Hyatt
1 Market Pl, San Diego, CA 92101

Program:

Opening Remarks by Supervisor Greg Cox, Dept of Environmental Health, and Peter Halmay
Panel Discussion (Moderated by Dr. Theresa Talley) - Sustainable Seafood: Strategies for all of us
Drinks + Local Seafood (tuna, urchin, and other fresh catch!)

Panel Discussion

Sustainable seafood: Strategies for all of us

Moderator: Dr. Theresa Sinicrope Talley, Coastal Specialist, California Sea Grant Extension Program, Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego  

Definitions of “sustainable seafood” often focus on the guidelines and regulations for fisheries and aquafarms that are set by international groups, domestic government agencies, and external groups (e.g., NGOs, Certifications) because they are predicted to lead to sustainability, such as limiting catch amounts, and reducing by-catch and environmental impacts. Many day to day decisions made by producers and consumers influence the actual types and amounts of seafood produced and so also strongly influence sustainability. We therefore propose that, within the regulatory bounds, there are many strategies that producers, consumers and others within our local food system can take to contribute to sustainability. These strategies may include actions that diversify the seafood produced in fisheries and farms, shorten seafood supply chains, encourage transparency in food sources and pathways, and that support and increase interactions with local fisherman and aquafarmers. It therefore makes sense that we inform and empower people throughout the whole food system to make their own decisions about sustainability tactics. With this panel of people working across the food system, we will begin a conversation of the types of strategies that consumers, producers, and others in the food system can follow in making informed sustainability decisions.

 

Background

California Governor Jerry Brown has signed new legislation this October to streamline the permitting and operation of direct, local fishermen’s markets in California. Dubbed the “Pacific to Plate” bill and sponsored by Speaker Toni Atkins (D-San Diego), AB 226 allows fishermen’s markets to operate as food facilities, vendors to clean their fish for direct sale, and multiple fishermen to organize a market under a single permit. The process to develop a bill started a result of the success of the Tuna Harbor Dockside Market in San Diego which opened on August 2, 2014 and initially received temporary permitting to test out the viability of the local seafood market. In its first months, the market averaged an impressive 350 customers and 1.1 tons of seafood sold each week, generating about $15,000 in direct sales. 

This policy win for local fisheries statewide was an outcome of a collaborative effort led by County of San Diego Department of Environmental Health between the founders of Tuna Harbor Dockside Market, County Supervisor Cox and his staff, Port Commissioner Bob Nelson, the Unified Port of San Diego, California Sea Grant, NOAA, California Restaurant Association, The Maritime Alliance, California Coastal Conservancy, the local media, and Speaker Toni Atkins. AB 226 was introduced by Atkins in February 2015 and received unanimous support in the California Assembly and Senate. It was a win-win for both California’s thriving local food movement and small business owners.

Peter Halmay, Member of Fishermen's Market Working Group, expects the new permits will lead to more fishermen transferring their direct sales from small, off-boat operations to bustling markets in California’s coastal communities. “I see one in Ventura, Santa Barbara, Half Moon Bay – all of them have some form of market. All of [these fishermen] will be able to look at this legislation and say, ‘Hey, we exist.’”

The San Diego Food System Alliance is thrilled about the presence of a local fishermen's market which connects consumers directly to the fishermen and their catch, as well as the policy win which supports fishermen's markets statewide. Please join us in celebrating the bill and the local fisheries industry in San Diego! 

Earlier Event: December 5
Vinavanti Urban Winery Grand Opening
Later Event: February 2
Soil Matters